What Is A Good Lead In For A Quote?

How do you lead out of a quote?

A strong lead out should identify the key words or parts of the quote that support your point and relate the information back to your thesis.

The length of your lead out should reflect the length of the quotation-the longer the quote the more lead outs you will need to explain it..

How do you transition after a quote?

When you use quotes, you must first use a transitional phrase (such as “For example,…”, “In addition”, “Furthermore”, etc…). This is called the transition. Secondly, you must first provide the context of the quote (who is speaking and in what situation?). This is called the lead-in.

What can I use instead of this quote show?

this shows / synonymsthis demonstrates.this illustrates.this suggests.this indicates.this proves.this displays.this implies. v.this portrays.More items…

What is the lead sentence?

Put simply, a lead sentence is a sentence that opens and summarizes an essay, a section of an essay, or a paragraph perfectly. I’d like to give you three examples of lead sentences – one for an entire essay, one for a section, and one for a paragraph.

What is a lead in for a quote?

What are Lead-Ins? Lead-ins, also called signal phrases and tag lines, introduce direct quotations in a research paper. They can appear at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of the direct quotation from an outside source.

How do you write an engaging lead?

How do I get my students to write engaging leads?Show them. Use mentor texts and show students engaging hooks in stories. … Find them. Give students books and narrative resources and have them find strong examples of the different types of leads. … Practice.

What are the different kinds of lead?

Different Types of LeadsSummary Lead. A summary lead is the most common and traditional lead in journalism. … Single-Item Lead. This lead focuses on just one or two elements of a summary lead. … Delayed Identification Lead. … Creative Lead. … Short Sentence Lead. … Analogy Lead.

How do you properly quote?

Proper Punctuation – QuotesIf you start by telling who said it, use a comma and then the first quotation mark. … If you put the quote first and then tell who said it, use a comma at the end of the sentence, and then the second quotation mark. … Punctuation always goes inside the quotation marks if it is a direct quote.More items…

What are some good lead ins?

10 worthy examples of good lead sentences and paragraphsShort and simple. … Ooh, tell me more. … Meanwhile, at San Quentin. … Ouch. … An oldie but man, what a goodie. … Dialogue lead. … The staccato lead. … Hey, that’s me.More items…•

What is a question lead?

Question Lead Question leads do just that: ask a question. Although they are effective in sparking interest, use them sparingly because they generally do not provide the main points of a story as concisely.

How do you begin to explain a quote?

ICE: Introduce, Cite, and Explain Your EvidenceINTRODUCE: Introduce all your quotes using introductory phrases. … CITE: Provide appropriate parenthetical citations for all quotes and paraphrases (but not summaries). … EXPLAIN: Make sure to explain your quotes. … Activity: With a partner, work to fix the introductions and citations in the paragraph below.

How do you transition smoothly into a quote?

Integrating Quotations into SentencesIntroduce the quotation with a complete sentence and a colon. … Use an introductory or explanatory phrase, but not a complete sentence, separated from the quotation with a comma. … Make the quotation a part of your own sentence without any punctuation between your own words and the words you are quoting.More items…

What can a transition be?

A transition can be a single word, a phrase, a sentence, or an entire paragraph. In each case, it functions the same way: First, the transition either directly summarizes the content of a preceding sentence, paragraph, or section or implies such a summary (by reminding the reader of what has come before).

How do you analyze a quote?

Ways to analyze Look at the subtle parts of the quote, and explain why the author used them in his writing–Tone, diction, mood, figurative language (metaphors, similes, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification… there are A LOT).